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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
China's Tianzhou-3 cargo spacecraft launch September 20, 7:30am UTC.

"China launches the Tianzhou-3 unmanned cargo spacecraft on a Long March 7 carrier rocket from the Wenchang Spacecraft Launch Site in south China's Hainan Province. The launch is part of the construction project of China's space station Tiangong, which is scheduled to complete in 2022. It will be the second cargo resupply mission to the already launched Tianhe core module."
- Source: CGTN

Any Chinese broadcast live is rare. It's on CGTN which it their English station owned by the Chinese Government. You'll probably only see the edited recap later today unless you're up to see it live. If it fails, they usually pull the video.

Enjoy! 



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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
Here's the Space X Inspiration4 splashdown. It's live for those who check this channel, scheduled for September 18, splashing down at approximately 7:06 p.m. EDT. It's a replay if you missed it.



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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
Here's a photo of TiSPACE's Hapith I rocket. They tested it on September 15th, 2021. They didn't broadcast it as I guess they felt they were going to be upstaged by Space X's all-civilian launch. Anyway, we were there and managed to snap one pic from afar. I've posted it as a reply as you can only post one pic at a time as a comment. Hapith means "flying squirrel" in Taiwanese. Looks more like an IED.
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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
Here's another short notice launch: Arianespace Flight ST35 - OneWeb.

Given the nature of the launch (polar orbit) it has a zero launch window so it goes on September 14th at 18:07 UTC or it doesn't.

"Flight ST35, performed by Arianespace and its Starsem affiliate from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on September 14 at 11.07pm (local time), will put 34 of OneWeb’s satellites into a near-polar orbit at an altitude of 450 kilometers. The mission will have a total duration of 3 hours and 45 minutes and will include a first separation of two satellites followed by eight separations of four satellites, which will raise themselves to their operational orbit.
This launch represents an important step in Arianespace’s career, as it will see the 1,000th satellite processed by the European launch service operator reach its orbit. Throughout a 41-year history, Arianespace has orbited all types of satellites and spacecraft, from connectivity and broadcast to Earth observation and science, allowing its customers to reach all kind of destinations into space, from close orbits to deep space locations.
This 60th launch of Soyuz operated by Arianespace, the 10th to the benefit of OneWeb, will raise to 322 the number of satellites deployed for the global telecommunications operator. OneWeb’s constellation will deliver high-speed, low-latency connectivity services to a wide range of customer sectors including aviation, maritime, backhaul services, as well as governments, emergency response services and more. Central to its purpose, OneWeb seeks to bring connectivity to every place where fiber cannot reach, and thereby bridge the digital divide.
Once deployed, the OneWeb constellation will enable user terminals that are capable of offering 3G, LTE, 5G and Wi-Fi coverage, providing high-speed access globally  by air, sea and land.
OneWeb Satellites, a joint venture between OneWeb and Airbus Defence and Space, is the constellation’s prime contractor. The satellites were built thanks to its leading-edge satellite manufacturing process that can build up to two satellites a day on a series production line dedicated to the assembly, integration, and testing of the satellites.
Liftoff is scheduled for Tuesday, September 14, 2021 at exactly:
- 02:07 p.m., in Washington, D.C.,
- 06:07 p.m., Universal Time (UTC),
- 08:07 p.m., in Paris,
- 09:07 p.m., in Moscow,
- 11:07 p.m., Baikonur Cosmodrome."

Enjoy!



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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
Here's a launch with very short notice (30 minutes). Space X is like that at times.

"SpaceX is targeting Monday, September 13 for a Falcon 9 launch of 51 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. The instantaneous window is at 8:55 p.m. PDT, or September 14 at 3:55 UTC, and a backup"



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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
Russian EVA - 49, September 3, 2020, starts at 16:00 UTC.

If you've never seen an EVA, it might be of interest. These are LLLLLLLOOOOONNNNNGGGG.... and somewhat tedious. Sometimes, something happens. You do get great views of the Earth in the background, however.

The purpose of the EVA is to connect the MLM Nauka module (launched last month) to the Zvezda module. Cosmonauts Oleg Novitskiy and Pyotr Dubrov will be performing the EVA. 

Enjoy!



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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
Watch Firefly launch their FIRST EVER orbital rocket, Alpha! *** Live *** September 3rd 02:00 UTC.

That's 9pm Tuesday for the time challenged. 

Who knows what this will be as it's the maiden launch from an unknown company? From what I understand, they're aiming for the ride share market of small to medium sized orbital payloads which would be a direct competitor to the company I'm invested in (Rocket Labs). Still, I wish them the best. It's a small community with room for all...except that dick Bezos!

As with launches of this type, they can be delayed for hours or scrubbed several times before an actual launch so it's for die hard rocket enthusiasts only. However, if you watched the Astra launch (they're now 0 for 4), they can be spectacular. I'll keep posting links until they get it right. The Youtube link shows when the broadcast will start in local time so just keep checking it as it can change.

Enjoy!



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Flushing
GB Level 1
Subbed and up voted
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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
Here's the NASA feed *** Live *** for the CRS-23 docking with the ISS, August 29th, 2021. It's supposed to occur at 3pm EDT, but who knows? Dockings tend to be very slow, but it does give you an idea what's going on up there. If it's a replay when you find this, play it at double speed. If you could play it at 10x speed, do so.



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mlivsey
CA Level 1 Supporter
This is Blue Origin's latest sub-orbital flight of the New Shephard rocket, which was posted, *** spoiler alert ***, after a successful flight earlier today. Why didn't they broadcast it live like all the other flights? Well, probably because they're suing NASA over a $3 Billion contract awarded to Space X for the lunar lander. This test flight collected data to prove to NASA that Blue Origin could do the job as well. Decide for yourself. NASA has put the Space X contract on hold pending the resolution of the lawsuit filed by Blue Origin.

There's a repeat of the first manned millionaire's flight at the start. Skip to 1:20:58 for the T-5:00 mark. A quick summary of the previous flights is provided at that point followed by the mission. At around 1:33:00, the crazy descent and landing of the rocket takes place. I'm still waiting for the engine to fail as it'll be a spectacular explosion given how wacky the landing is. The capsule landing follows at around 1:34:20.

I'm still not sure where Bezos thinks he's going with all this. Blue Origin's motto:

2000: "We're Blue Origin and this is just the beginning."
2021: "We're Blue Origin and this is just the beginning."

The name "New Shephard" is appropriate as it's named after Alan Shephard, the first American in space, who did a fifteen minute sub-orbital flight. Last month, sixty years later, Blue Origin achieved the same.

There's a real rocket launch (Space X) coming up on the 28th, but it's at around 3:37 EDT so I might just post it to this group.

Enjoy!
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